Team Focus: Allstacks!

The Innovators Program is chugging along, and I was excited to learn more about one of our awesome external teams last week, Allstacks. CEO Hersh Tapadia and CTO Jeremy Freeman have partnered together for 10 years, and after years of collaborating on project after project, they identified a hole in the project management market for a good analytics tool that gave useful data to drive decision-making.

Allstacks is business intelligence tool for engineering management in which they pul together all the data that is generated by the team and give them leading indicators of project health so they can better direct their attention and ship better quality products on time without having to spend a lot of time digging around trying to figure out what’s actually going on.

Dashboard of Allstacks

We had the chance to chat with Hersh and learn more about what drove their team to build Allstacks and how years of experience can groom you for building the perfect product! 

If you’d like to learn more about Allstacks and how it can transform your project management, learn more today!

Learn more about Allstacks!


Magdalyn: Why did you decide to apply for the Innovators Program?

Hersh: Primarily what made us want to apply was the partnership with Citrix and Red Hat. They’re two prototypical customers for our company, so it gave us the opportunity to work really closely with that type of customers to build a good product.

M: Awesome! What are you most looking forward to in this program?

H: We’ve been able to define some structure around working with our customers that allows us to recognize patterns and identify areas where we can make small changes that have large impact, and what really drove that was the tools that have been taught in the program. 

M: What skills or backgrounds do you each bring to your team?

H: It’s kind of an interesting story about me and my partner, we’ve been working together for over ten years, and this is our fourth company together. We met when we were in undergrad and i was spinning a company out of the university that was a medical device, and my partner jeremy was my first hire. that company was more bleeding-edge, and jeremy and the team wrote all the software for that. We ended up getting picked up and acqui-hired (before acqui-hiring was a thing) by a startup coming out of Johnson and Johnson. So I joined as a cofounder of that company and i was able to bring over the technology. I was able to hire back the critical parts of that team, so once again Jeremy was the first hire. We ran product there for 6 years, and we were ready to do something new, so we ended up building a business for 2 years looking for our next idea. We ended up working on a confluence of factors – data science projects, API development, and other algorithm development tools – we didn’t realize it then, but basically over the past 10 years we had trained ourselves in all the different components that allowed us to develop Allstacks really quickly. We built and launched the product in less than three months. 

M: What was the “ah-ha” moment that led to starting your company?

H: The idea came to us kind of two ways – my partner and i had actually had launched another data-based company, and when we actually ran the data, we found out that the data from the original product we had didn’t work out, but there was one slice of that product that was really interesting to our customers – people were interested in knowing what the productivity of their employees was inside of the tools that they’re paying for. So we started trying to understand that market and looked deeper into the productivity analytics market, and what we found is that there was a huge hole for engineering management. 

We then came at it from another angle in that we thought back to our experiences – because my partner and i both happen to be engineering and product managers for 10 years – and realized that it was actually a problem. We thought back to our own experiences working with senior management and how frustrating it was that we weren’t able to give good, quantitative answers to how things are going. We realized that the part of the problem was that there wasn’t good data available, and whatever data that was available is very siloed and not holistic. and by looking at that kind of data lead to blinded, partially-informed decision making which was really ineffective.

M: Short answer, what problem are you trying to solve?

H: Helping engineering build better products ahead of schedule and under budget.

M: What’s your biggest take-away from the Innovators Program so far?

H: It’s really important to be consistent in how you interact with your customers so you can identify patterns, and by doing that, it’s been really helpful. 

M:  When you are not working tirelessly to launch a company, how do you spend your time?

I think what’s really important for me is not losing the social connections that make life meaningful, so carving time out for that is really important so you don’t lose yourself in your business. My wife and I dedicate time to our friends and family every week so that’s really helpful.


Thanks Hersh for sharing your thoughts and progress with us, looking forward to seeing Allstacks grow and thrive!

If you’d like to learn more about Allstacks or the Innovators Program, check out more here.

Allstacks   Innovators Program

Visit us soon for more interviews with this year’s participants!

Cheers! -Magdalyn

 

Meet the corporate innovators shaking things up at Red Hat

We’re officially halfway through the 2016 Innovators Program Raleigh! The three-month accelerator program, sponsored by Red Hat, Citrix, and HQ Raleigh, helps early-stage tech startups develop a go-to-market strategy, find customers, and prepare for their first round of funding.

In this week’s Q&A feature, we’re taking a closer look at two internal innovation teams from Red Hat. Both teams are focused on creating next-generation people programs for internal use.

The Red Hat Performance Management and Development team is working on a performance management process that focuses on associate development and is scalable for Red Hat’s future. The team includes Arrie Brown, Jorge Herrera, Beverly Heustess, and Kim Jokisch, and is supported by Geri Duncan.

The Red Hat Ambassadors team is creating a transparent, efficient, and scalable referral program that can enhance both the associate and candidate experience. This team includes Jonathan Edwards, Jorge Herrera, and Jenna Slawson, and is supported by Rob Trout.

We asked both teams about their experience in the program so far.

Tell us about a typical “day in the life” for your team during the Innovators Program.

Beverly Heustess (BH): The pace of the project is so fast and our schedule so dynamic that nothing is routine. We regularly discuss what we need to accomplish daily and for that week, but we plan for the plan to change.

Jorge Herrera (JH): I don’t think there’s such thing as a “typical” day in this project!

Arrie Brown (AB): Even our workspaces change from day to day. We split our time between Red Hat Tower, Citrix, and HQ Raleigh, which is a cool co-working space in downtown Raleigh.

What’s it like to be on a team with fellow Red Hat associates from different departments within the company?

BH: Partnering with Red Hatters from completely different departments has been neat. We each bring unique experiences, knowledge, and specialties to the table that together cover the breadth of this project. I’ve been learning a lot about how to leverage our individual personalities and work styles as we navigate through challenges.

Kim Jokisch (KJ): It has been a great experience to work with smart, hard working people from other teams that I otherwise wouldn’t get to work with. We all have different skill sets and it’s rewarding to see how our diverse talents come together to tackle the same problem.

Jonathan Edwards (JE): This is one of the biggest benefits of the program. As a company that prides itself on meritocracy and collaboration, you don’t always get the chance to work with everyone. This has given me an opportunity to work with people like Jenna and Jorge, and it reminds me how much hard work is happening in every department at every level.

Jenna Slawson (JS): It’s been a great change of pace. I’ve learned so much from Jonathan and Rob about Talent Acquisition around organizational structure, process, and associate referrals. Jorge has taught me how our systems are setup and supported, as well as how vendors fit into that process.

It’s a unique opportunity for a full-time, corporate employee to participate in a startup accelerator. What has the experience been like?

JS: One of the great opportunities has been working and researching in an area that I’m interested in but wouldn’t normally get to experience. As a sociology minor in college and a current member of a diversity and inclusion group here at Red Hat, it’s been great to research, interview, and learn more about diversity and inclusion best practices across top companies in the industry.

KJ: It has been interesting to figure out how to take the best of the startup approach and apply it to Red Hat. Yes, we are a large company, and we have an open culture that demands transparency and agility. It has been fun to see what works and what we need to supplement to make the start-up approach work within an open culture with 10,000+ associates.

BH: It’s awesome to jump into a totally different space on a project like this. I am learning about trends in the HR field, which is completely different than my regular work in IT. What’s really cool is how using Red Hat’s Open Decision Framework comes naturally, even though the subject area is new to me. That’s our transparent culture at work!

What’s one thing you’ve learned from the program that you’d like to take back to your day job?

AB: I’ve become more comfortable with asking for help!

Geri Duncan (GD): As the portfolio manager for talent management, and as a relatively new Red Hatter, I have learned the immense value of the Open Decision Framework [Red Hat’s process for making inclusive decisions]. It is so powerful to understand what people across the company and globe think about performance management, and every voice has been factored into how we’re shaping our team recommendations.

JE: Taking four days to conduct a “sprint” is an amazingly productive use of time. Within a high-growth company like Red Hat, we are often just trying to keep up with all that we do. Taking time to reflect on a problem and work intensely to propose solutions to it is extremely valuable.

JH: From the IT developer perspective, it’s the insights that collaborating with our customers brings. From the designing phase to implementation, collaboration is key.

What do you like to do when you’re not working on the program?

KJ: I’m a new mom so I love playing with my son and making him laugh. I also love to decorate, eat, cook, and read.

AB: I’m on a kick of making terrariums right now. Bring me your weird, your old, your interesting glass vessels, and I’ll put a clump of pretty moss in it.

JE: All things Bruce Springsteen, Cape Cod, and running.

JS: I’m currently working on slowly renovating our house which is a few miles from Red Hat.

Stay tuned for more updates from the other Innovators Program participants in the coming weeks.